Veteran Employment in Energy and Oil and Gas on the Rise

North Dakota Oilfield Camp

North Dakota Oilfield Camp

At a remote camp miles and miles from civilization, a team is gearing up for the day’s assigned operation. Helmets are secured as the team leader performs his final checks ensuring everyone is properly equipped for the strenuous mission ahead. The team knows the mission will likely continue into the night.

It’s bitterly cold, with wind chills of -20 degrees, but the mission must continue. The rugged men and women assigned to the outpost know their job. They are a dedicated tight-knit team with the mindset that failure is not an option. Day after day and night after night they get the job done. This is not a remote forward operating base in the snow covered mountains of Afghanistan, it’s an oilfield camp in North Dakota.

hires_4438188636_82509e3c57_bAccording to the Government Accountability Office, over the next five years, one million veterans are expected to leave military service. These Veterans are ideal candidates for oil and gas, and transportation companies. Veterans often bring experience and much needed certifications enabling them to be more quickly on-boarded, easier to train, and generally more capable with managing their schedule and priorities.

gI_90173_MFE14HiResRealizing this, energy companies have begun a variety of programs to bring veterans on-board, some with greater success than others. GI Jobs recognizes companies such as Fluor Corp which was recently named a “Top 100 Military Friendly Employer” for the eighth year in a row. Furthermore, 5 of the 35 Top 35 Veteran Employers (according to Military.com) are energy, oil and gas, or power, not including companies such as Schneider National Inc. which specializes in trucking.

The Houston Chronicle reported last spring that there was a significant increase in the number of veteran hiring programs among energy companies throughout Houston, Texas.

Forward March Inc Military Talent Pipeline Services - Affordable, Customized, Scalable

Forward March Inc Military Talent Pipeline Services – Affordable, Customized, Scalable

Forward March Inc. specializes in helping companies of all size learn how to efficiently find, attract, hire and retain high quality veteran talent. Our 35 year plus history of bringing companies and veterans together enables us to bring customized and scalable solutions that will enable your organization to bring the right military talent on board at the right time. Unlike many other companies we can give you a valuable mission plan that will enable your organization to retain veteran talent and subsequently build a vibrant veteran culture.

Contact Forward March Inc. today to learn more. 

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Veterans, Transitioning Military Personnel, and their families are encouraged to meet with employers at this free event.

Veterans, Transitioning Military Personnel, and their families are encouraged to meet with employers at this free event.

Your Company Needs Veterans!

VETERANS U NEED THEM

High quality military talent… It’s what your company or organization needs!

Did you know that approximately three quarters of the age eligible population of the United States couldn’t qualify for military service?

Did you know that, according to the DOLless than ten percent of the U.S. population are veterans?

Did you know that almost thirty percent of veterans over the age of twenty-five have a bachelor’s degree or higher?

Did you know that veterans frequently leave military service with valuable certifications and training that is highly sought after by companies?

Did you know that the average military veteran brings a wealth of experience, leadership and management skills, communication skills, and experience working in a variety of environments and situations?

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Today’s veterans are among the most educated, technically savvy, and diverse group of veterans in our nation’s history. Today’s veterans even, at their lowest levels of rank, have experience in working in diverse environments, putting leadership training to use in the workplace, working in trusted environments, and communicating clearly and directly. Veterans transitioning out of the military today have certifications and training in a wide variety of fields including, but not limited to, truck driving, mechanics, engineering, IT and computer networking, IT security, and much more.

We have been helping companies hire veterans for over 35 years!

Forward March Inc. (FMI) has experience working with companies to build a highly successful military talent pipeline. We have helped companies learn how to find, attract, hire and retain high quality military talent for energy related jobs from truck drivers to managers and engineers. We take all the guesswork out of the process of attaining a powerful veteran workforce.

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The Camouflage to Corporate Conference will be held on November 17th, in San Antonio, Texas. This powerful conference has a reputation for helping companies and organizations learn about the process of finding and hiring veterans. Attendees will come away with valuable knowledge to get them started with hiring high quality veteran talent. FMI will also give a detailed overview of how we can bring our customized and scalable solutions to your organization to help you achieve mission success.

Veterans, Transitioning Military Personnel, and their families are encouraged to meet with employers at this free event.

Veterans, Transitioning Military Personnel, and their families are encouraged to meet with employers at this free event.

This conference will be very special as FMI will be rolling out our Veteran Employment Transition Networking Event. This event will be from 1pm to 4pm on November 17th and will focus on connecting veterans and transitioning military with companies, organizations, and educational institutions. FMI has over 35 years of collective experience bringing veterans and companies together and is very proud to be able to facilitate this very special opportunity. FMI is a company of veterans committed to helping veterans. This is why there will be no charge to veterans and transitioning military or to companies, organizations and educational institutions who want to attend.

To learn more about the Veteran Employment Transition Networking Event and how to register for free on our website, click here.

While this outstanding event is in conjunction with our Camouflage to Corporate Conference, admission to the Conference is separate. To learn more about Camouflage to Corporate and how to register on our website, click here.

Forward March Inc Military Hiring Guide

Forward March Inc Military Hiring Guide

Hiring Military and Veteran Talent

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Part 2 of a special 3 part series:

Hiring Military and Veteran Talent

Attracting military talent can be an overwhelming task, especially for those organizations that do not understand military culture, but attracting military talent is only part of the puzzle. The second piece is the military veteran hiring process.

Here are four things to think about when hiring veterans.

Screening Military Talent.

Often, military resumes can be confusing and too easily dismissed by recruiters and hiring managers.   So what exactly is a Yeoman or a Boatswain Mate in the Navy? What does an Air Battle Manager in the Air Force do? How do the skills of an Army Infantryman translate into civilian skills? What does a Marine Corps Basic Field Artilleryman bring to the table?

Veterans from each branch of service will be given a job specialty and in some cases, more than one job specialty. Many of these jobs transfer directly to civilian occupations, such as a human resource specialist or a lab technician. Some other military specialties may not. The bottom line here is that these are merely the jobs that the service member went to school to learn, and do not paint the whole picture of the intangible skills a veteran possesses.

Let’s go back to the Army Infantryman, for example, and break down a typical career. While it’s true, an infantryman might not be a direct fit for a specific job in your organization, many of the skills and education he receives over the course of a career are invaluable. Sometimes we need to look beyond titles.

A senior infantryman, over his career, has led hundreds of people in the most demanding and chaotic of situations imaginable. This person most likely completed a special duty assignment as a recruiter, drill sergeant, or instructor. He might have performed career enhancing positions such as an equal opportunity advisor, doctrine writer, or advisor to a foreign military. He may have even completed congressional fellowships and been assigned to Capitol Hill, or might have even worked on a Commanding General’s staff. He has attended dozens of professional military education courses or even cross trained into other military specialties. He most likely has a graduate degree. So as you can see, an infantryman at face value might not be a good fit, but when you peel back his various assignments and accomplishments, it’s clear that the individual is bringing a lot to the table.

Instead of filing military resumes into the trash, take the time to look at them and truly understand what it means to serve our great nation. Don’t dismiss applicants simply because they are veterans; embrace their service, support our troops, and schedule them for an interview.

Interviewing Military Talent

Now that we have tackled the screening process, let’s move into the interview. I am sure, at this point, the resume has generated more questions than answers, and that is perfectly acceptable. After all, that’s what the interview is all about.

Perhaps the best way for an interviewer to understand what a veteran did while in the military is to use a technique called behavioral event interviewing. This technique asks the candidate to describe situations and experiences they had while in the service. The answers to these questions cannot be rehearsed ahead of time and allows the veteran to open up about their military experience. Their answers will also help the interviewer find how their experiences and background will fit into the culture of the organization.

Example of questions an interviewer might ask:

  • Tell me about a time in the Air Force where you really stepped up to a challenge, offered an innovative solution, or took a high risk that paid off.
  • Tell me about a project or task in the Navy where you found yourself having to react to a major unexpected obstacle or change. What was the situation and what did you do?
  • Tell me about a time in the Marine Corps you worked on a project where a very diverse group of people were brought together to achieve a common goal.
  • I see on your resume, you attended the Army’s Warrior Leader Course. What did you take away from that training and how does it apply to this organization?
  • Your resume stated you were a Platoon Sergeant in the Marine Corps. What exactly is a Platoon Sergeant?
  • What additional military training and experience do you have, that would make you a good fit for our organization?
Forward March Inc Military Hiring Guide

The Forward March Inc Military Talent Hiring Guide can be customized for your organization.

Verifying Prior Service

The primary means of verifying an applicant’s veteran status is by viewing the Department of Defense Form 214, or DD 214, as is it commonly called.  The DD 214 is basically a one page document that covers a service member’s entire career. It includes information such as their rank, military specialty, awards, schools attended, periods of service, and type of discharge. Since the DD 214 is filled with all sorts of codes, and phrases, this single document is a great source for interview questions.

When a service member is separated from the military, they are given two copies of the DD 214: a long version, or Member Copy, and a short form. The long form has specific information in regard to the type of discharge the veteran was given.

Employers can ask for copies of the DD 214 as a means of verifying prior service. Be cautious of how your hiring managers use the information as it could become an EO issue. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, the Veteran’s Administration, and the Department of Labor are all on the same page when it comes to asking for the DD 214. Asking a veteran, “Did you receive an Honorable or General Discharge?” is fine. Asking the reason for discharge, however, can pose a problem. Suppose a veteran received an honorable discharge but was separated for a medical reason. Asking why that veteran was discharged would force them to expose a medical condition, which in turn could lead to discrimination in hiring.

If the veteran applicant served in the National Guard, he or she will be given a similar form as the DD 214 called the National Guard Bureau Form 22 or NGB 22.

Our Camouflage to Corporate Conference can get you on the fast track to developing a Veteran Talent Pipeline. November 17th, San Antonio, Texas.

We can get you on the fast track to developing a Veteran Talent Pipeline. November 17th, San Antonio, Texas.

Military Talent Employment Laws, Rules, and Regulations

For companies that are committed to hiring veterans, not only are they getting top talent that is motivated, well-educated, and full of leadership potential, but there are many other incentives. Companies that hire veterans receive tax breaks, have employees with educational benefits, and see reduced manpower costs. Here are some key protocols in regard to veteran hiring.

  • Vietnam Era Veteran’s Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974 (VEVRAA) prohibits discrimination against veterans and requires federal contractors and subcontractors to take affirmative action to employ veterans.
  • Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) protects the jobs of guard and reserve members called to active duty.
  • Veterans Opportunity to Work to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 (VOW Act) provides tax credits to companies that hire unemployed and wounded veterans.
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) establishes nondiscrimination practices for the employment of people with disabilities to include disabled veterans.
  • Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) enforces, for the benefit of job seekers and wage earners, the contractual promise of affirmative action and equal employment opportunity required of those who do business with the Federal government.

Finding, attracting, hiring, and retaining military talent is a skill that companies looking for the highest caliber employees simply must have. Forward March not only trains top companies to do this, but we have also created a Military Talent Hiring Guide that teaches organizations the basics of military talent acquisition and retention. If your organization is truly dedicated to hiring veterans, leave it to FMI to help make it happen. Click here and take the next step by attending out upcoming Camouflage to Corporate event and gain the skills needed to achieve your veteran hiring goals.

MILITARY HIRING 101 EVENT

Did you know that Forward March Inc also has conducts Hiring 101 Events which will give you the information and tools you need to succeed in hiring the very best military candidates. Our highly successful solutions are based on the proven military leadership models and a systematic approach to organizational growth. Learn more here. 

~ Article written by Jason Caswell, Forward March Inc – Director of Training and Talent Pipeline Services